[embed]https://vimeo.com/674542071[/embed] Presenting our next #MovingInRealTime dance film piece "Untie Our Tangles" performed and choreographed by Andrea Hodos, Co-Founder of Dancing Through Parkinson's. This is a Moving In Real Time dance in response to antisemitic violence and rhetoric. Artistic Director, Laura Karlin has a few words to share about Andrea. "I have known Andrea since 2010, since she helped to co-found Dancing Through Parkinson’s. She is a powerful force for justice, nuance, clarity and peace in the world. In the wake of the Colleyville synagogue hostage crisis and the rise of antisemitic violence and rhetoric, I asked Andrea to create a solo for Invertigo’s

[embed]https://vimeo.com/672167996[/embed] We are so excited to share with you Chelsea Roquero's solo, "devoted." as part of our MOVING IN REAL TIME dance film collections commissioned by Invertigo Dance Theatre.  Moving In Real Time is a project dedicated to artists creating and responding to where we are in the world today. "devoted." was commissioned in response to violence against AAPI communities, especially women. We offered Chelsea a platform to respond and she used it to elevate joy and family. We're so honored to received your dance, Chelsea. Take a moment to read about Chelsea Roquero's creative process below, and watch the film! Laura Karlin: Would

The Dancing Through Parkinson’s (DTP) community grows continuously and in the most unexpected and wonderful ways. There is always a sharing and exchange when DTP Community gathers, and we consist of dancers, participants, artists and musicians who love to support, laugh, and groove together.   Invertigo has been incredibly fortunate to have within our DTP community, Brian Tagomori. A DTP dancer and musician who participated in our Tarzana classes before the lockdown, and now attends both our Electric Lodge and Online Zoom classes. It is through Brian Tagomori that Invertigo Dance Theatre heard about writer and songstress Whitney LePon.    Whitney’s voice has echoed

LOS ANGELES (August 20, 2021) — Invertigo Dance Theatre’s new multidisciplinary dance collaboration, The Kitchen Table Project,  activates communal healing through a web of interconnected dance films, immersive virtual experiences and (eventual) in-person performances using  the ritual of gathering around the kitchen table as its stage and thematic center. To support the project’s continued development and 2022 premiere, Invertigo has launched a crowdfunding campaign with a goal of raising $20,000 from now until September 13; donors will receive personal invitations to Invertigo’s free virtual Fall Soiree on October 21, which will include the premiere of the latest film in The

From March through June of 2021, I had the opportunity to work with Invertigo Dance Theatre as a Communications Intern. Coming off almost two full semesters of online education at LMU, where I was a sophomore communications major, I wondered whether remote work would be particularly limiting, and whether I could be as productive virtually as I could be in-person. However, it quickly became clear that there was nothing to stress about, and that I would easily be able to make my time with Invertigo both meaningful and enjoyable. The two wonderful interns before me helped set me up with

The Kitchen Table Project was conceived around the time I joined the staff at Invertigo, that is, at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. I’d been unmoored for about a year after finishing grad school in June 2019; I knew I didn’t want to go back to the kinds of marketing jobs I had before, and if I were to continue in arts administration in some capacity, I wanted my time to focus less on ticket sales and more on program development and finding money to do all the art and important stuff that got me into